Clinicians more likely to prescribe benzodiazepine if they don’t believe in potential risks

Patients of clinicians who believe the potential harms of benzodiazepines are low were at a greater risk of being prescribed them, survey results of primary care physicians showed in Annals of Family Medicine.
Benzodiazepines are a leading contributor to prescription drug deaths, yet the proportion of adults prescribed benzodiazepines has remained unchanged, Donovan T. Maust, MD, associate director of the geriatric psychiatry program at the University of Michigan, and colleagues wrote.
Maust and colleagues sought to identify whether clinician beliefs influence benzodiazepine prescribing. The

Patients of clinicians who believe the potential harms of benzodiazepines are low were at a greater risk of being prescribed them, survey results of primary care physicians showed in Annals of Family Medicine.
Benzodiazepines are a leading contributor to prescription drug deaths, yet the proportion of adults prescribed benzodiazepines has remained unchanged, Donovan T. Maust, MD, associate director of the geriatric psychiatry program at the University of Michigan, and colleagues wrote.
Maust and colleagues sought to identify whether clinician beliefs influence benzodiazepine prescribing. The