Computerized diagnostic tool shows promise for early detection of cognitive impairment

A computerized diagnostic tool was able to distinguish patients with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment and dementia and may be useful in detecting early signs of cognitive impairment, according to a study published in JMIR Aging.
“Current rates of undetected dementia are reported to be as high as 61.7%, and available treatments are limited to promoting quality of life rather than reversal or cure of the disease process,” Siao Ye, a graduate student in the department of biosciences at Rice University, and colleagues wrote. “The ability to properly identify and treat

A computerized diagnostic tool was able to distinguish patients with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment and dementia and may be useful in detecting early signs of cognitive impairment, according to a study published in JMIR Aging.
“Current rates of undetected dementia are reported to be as high as 61.7%, and available treatments are limited to promoting quality of life rather than reversal or cure of the disease process,” Siao Ye, a graduate student in the department of biosciences at Rice University, and colleagues wrote. “The ability to properly identify and treat