Controlling blood sugar may improve response to exercise training, study finds

Exercise carries a long list of benefits for everyone. For people with metabolic diseases like pre-diabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, physical activity can help keep blood sugar levels in check and stave off diabetes-related nerve damage and heart disease. However, people with diabetes have lower aerobic exercise capacity than people without metabolic disease—that is, their bodies don't burn oxygen as efficiently and may also be resistant to improving exercise capacity with training.
Exercise carries a long list of benefits for everyone. For people with metabolic diseases like pre-diabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, physical activity can help keep blood sugar levels in check and stave off diabetes-related nerve damage and heart disease. However, people with diabetes have lower aerobic exercise capacity than people without metabolic disease—that is, their bodies don’t burn oxygen as efficiently and may also be resistant to improving exercise capacity with training.