High use of short-acting beta 2 agonists may be ‘danger signal’ of more severe asthma

Although infrequent, high use of short-acting beta 2 agonists was associated with more severe asthma, according to a study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.
Also, obesity and higher symptom scores at diagnosis can predict this higher long-term use of short-acting beta 2 agonists (SABAs), the researchers wrote, adding that high SABA users should be identified in clinical practice so providers can intervene.
“Short-term studies have associated high use of SABAs to poor outcomes of asthma, but no studies existed on long-term SABA use among patients

Although infrequent, high use of short-acting beta 2 agonists was associated with more severe asthma, according to a study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.
Also, obesity and higher symptom scores at diagnosis can predict this higher long-term use of short-acting beta 2 agonists (SABAs), the researchers wrote, adding that high SABA users should be identified in clinical practice so providers can intervene.
“Short-term studies have associated high use of SABAs to poor outcomes of asthma, but no studies existed on long-term SABA use among patients