Inequities observed in telemedicine use for cancer care during COVID-19 pandemic

As telemedicine use increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, Black patients with cancer had lower usage levels than white patients, according to study results presented during a virtual press briefing ahead of the ASCO Annual Meeting.
Uninsured patients and those who lived in suburban or rural areas and resided in low-socioeconomic status neighborhoods also had a lower likelihood of telemedicine use, researchers noted.
“Telemedicine has the potential to enhance cancer care by increasing accessibility to cancer visits — including outreach to patients who live far away from clinic —

As telemedicine use increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, Black patients with cancer had lower usage levels than white patients, according to study results presented during a virtual press briefing ahead of the ASCO Annual Meeting.
Uninsured patients and those who lived in suburban or rural areas and resided in low-socioeconomic status neighborhoods also had a lower likelihood of telemedicine use, researchers noted.
“Telemedicine has the potential to enhance cancer care by increasing accessibility to cancer visits — including outreach to patients who live far away from clinic —