Initiatives aim to improve racial, ethnic diversity ‘across entire cancer care continuum’

Cancer centers, advocacy groups and other organizations have ramped up efforts to reduce disparities across the cancer care continuum, according to presenters at the virtual National Comprehensive Cancer Network 2022 Annual Conference.
“Despite Black individuals having higher incidence and/or mortality compared with white individuals in the U.S. for the most common cancer types — and despite cancer being the No. 1 cause of death for Hispanics in the U.S. — Blacks and Hispanics made up only 4% each of [participants in clinical trials] in 2018 that led to FDA drug approvals,”

Cancer centers, advocacy groups and other organizations have ramped up efforts to reduce disparities across the cancer care continuum, according to presenters at the virtual National Comprehensive Cancer Network 2022 Annual Conference.
“Despite Black individuals having higher incidence and/or mortality compared with white individuals in the U.S. for the most common cancer types — and despite cancer being the No. 1 cause of death for Hispanics in the U.S. — Blacks and Hispanics made up only 4% each of [participants in clinical trials] in 2018 that led to FDA drug approvals,”