Insecure: New study links tap water avoidance and food insecurity

Many Americans take tap water for granted. Water bills are often less expensive compared to people's other bills, and tap water has been a part of most Americans' lives since they were born. For nearly 61 million Americans, however, tap water is either unavailable or untrusted. New research from Penn State and Northwestern University shows for the first time that in the United States, avoiding tap water is associated with a 20% to 30% increased likelihood of experiencing food insecurity, or the inability to reliably acquire the food one needs due to limited resources.
Many Americans take tap water for granted. Water bills are often less expensive compared to people’s other bills, and tap water has been a part of most Americans’ lives since they were born. For nearly 61 million Americans, however, tap water is either unavailable or untrusted. New research from Penn State and Northwestern University shows for the first time that in the United States, avoiding tap water is associated with a 20% to 30% increased likelihood of experiencing food insecurity, or the inability to reliably acquire the food one needs due to limited resources.