Short interfering RNA therapy dramatically lowers Lp(a) in phase 1 trial

WASHINGTON — In the phase 1 APOLLO study, a short interfering RNA therapy lowered lipoprotein(a) by a maximum of more than 90% in certain doses, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.
The agent, SLN360 (Silence Therapeutics), is one of several in development to reduce Lp(a), elevated levels of which are a major CVD risk factor and are not effectively treated by existing therapies.
“There are no approved therapies for treating lipoprotein(a); it’s kind of the last frontier,” Cardiology Today Editorial Board Member Steven E. Nissen,

WASHINGTON — In the phase 1 APOLLO study, a short interfering RNA therapy lowered lipoprotein(a) by a maximum of more than 90% in certain doses, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.
The agent, SLN360 (Silence Therapeutics), is one of several in development to reduce Lp(a), elevated levels of which are a major CVD risk factor and are not effectively treated by existing therapies.
“There are no approved therapies for treating lipoprotein(a); it’s kind of the last frontier,” Cardiology Today Editorial Board Member Steven E. Nissen,